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White-tailed Antelope Squirrel Native Parks



Total Results: 34 parks with White-tailed Antelope Squirrel

Arches National Park

Rank: 65 6 Activites Email: archinfo@nps.gov

Visit Arches and discover a landscape of contrasting colors, landforms and textures unlike any other in the world. The park has over 2,000 natural stone arches, in addition to hundreds of soaring pinnacles, massive fins and giant balanced rocks. This red rock wonderland will amaze you with its formations, refresh you with its trails, and inspire you with its sunsets.

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Aztec Ruins National Monument Park

Rank: 280 3 Activites Phone: (505)-334-6174 Email: AZRU_Information@nps.gov

Pueblo people describe this site as part of their migration journey. Today you can follow their ancient passageways to a distant time. Explore a 900-year old ancestral Pueblo Great House of over 400 masonry rooms. Look up and see original timbers holding up the roof. Search for the fingerprints of ancient workers in the mortar. Listen for an echo of ritual drums in the reconstructed Great Kiva.

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Bryce Canyon National Park

Rank: 54 5 Activites Email: brca_information@nps.gov

There is no place quite like Bryce Canyon. Hoodoos (odd-shaped pillars of rock left standing from the forces of erosion) can be found on every continent, but here is the archetypal "hoodoo-iferous" terrain. Descriptions fail. Cave without a roof? Forest of stone? Even photographs strain credulity. When you visit maybe you'll come up with a better name. In the meantime "Bryce" will have to suffice.

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Canyon De Chelly National Monument Park

Rank: 80 4 Activites Phone: (928)-674-2106 Email: CACH_Interpretation@nps.gov

They would tell you that for nearly 5,000 years, people have lived in these canyons - longer than anyone has lived uninterrupted anywhere on the Colorado Plateau. Their homes and images tell us their stories. Today, Navajo families make their homes, raise livestock, and farm the lands in the canyon. The National Park Service and Navajo Nation are actively working together to manage park resources.

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Canyonlands National Park

Rank: 120 7 Activites Email: canyinfo@nps.gov

Canyonlands invites you to explore a wilderness of countless canyons and fantastically formed buttes carved by the Colorado River and its tributaries. Rivers divide the park into four districts: the Island in the Sky, the Needles, the Maze, and the rivers themselves. These areas share a primitive desert atmosphere, but each offers different opportunities for sightseeing and adventure.

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Capitol Reef National Park

Rank: 93 7 Activites Phone: (435)-425-3791 Email: CARE_Interpretation@nps.gov

Located in south-central Utah in the heart of red rock country, Capitol Reef National Park is a hidden treasure filled with cliffs, canyons, domes and bridges in the Waterpocket Fold, a geologic monocline (a wrinkle on the earth) extending almost 100 miles.

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Chaco Culture National Historical Park

Rank: 304 3 Activites Phone: (505)-786-7014 Email: ramona_begay@nps.gov

Today the massive buildings of the ancestral Pueblo peoples still testify to the organizational and engineering abilities not seen anywhere else in the American Southwest. For a deeper contact with the canyon that was central to thousands of people between 850 and 1250 A.D., come and explore Chaco through guided tours, hiking & biking trails, evening campfire talks, and night sky programs.

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Colorado National Monument Park

Rank: 130 7 Activites Email: colm_info@nps.gov

Colorado National Monument preserves one of the grand landscapes of the American West. But this treasure is much more than a monument. Towering monoliths exist within a vast plateau and canyon panorama. You can experience sheer-walled, red rock canyons along the twists and turns of Rim Rock Drive, where you may spy bighorn sheep and soaring eagles.

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Death Valley National Park

Rank: 72 6 Activites Phone: (760)-786-3200

In this below-sea-level basin, steady drought and record summer heat make Death Valley a land of extremes. Yet, each extreme has a striking contrast. Towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Rare rainstorms bring vast fields of wildflowers. Lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife and humans. Despite its morbid name, a great diversity of life survives in Death Valley.

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El Malpais National Monument Park

Rank: 203 6 Activites Phone: (505)-876-2783 Email: rick_best@nps.gov

The primeval black basalt terrain of El Malpais was created by volcanic forces over the past million years. Molten lava spread out over the high desert from dozens of eruptions to create cinder cones, shield volcanos, collapses, trenches, caves, and other eerie formations. This stark landscape preserves one of the best continuous geologic records of volcanism on the planet.

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El Morro National Monument Park

Rank: 284 2 Activites Phone: (505)-783-4226 Email: richard_bacon@nps.gov

Imagine the comfort and refreshment of finding water after days of dusty travel. A reliable waterhole hidden at the base of a sandstone bluff made El Morro (the headland) a popular campsite for hundreds of years. Here, Ancestral Puebloans, Spanish and American travelers carved over 2,000 signatures, dates, messages, and petroglyphs. We invite you to make El Morro a stopping point on your travels.

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Golden Spike National Historic Site

Rank: 281 6 Activites Email: gosp_interpretation@nps.gov

May 10, 1869 the Union and Central Pacific Railroads joined their rails at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory and forged the destiny of a nation. Golden Spike National Historic Site shares the stories of the people and settings that define the completion of the first Transcontinental Railroad.

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Grand Canyon National Park

Rank: 12 8 Activites Phone: (928)-638-7888 Email: grca_information@nps.gov

A powerful and inspiring landscape, Grand Canyon overwhelms our senses through its immense size. Unique combinations of geologic color and erosional forms decorate a canyon that is 277 river miles (446km) long, up to 18 miles (29km) wide, and a mile (1.6km) deep. North Rim of the park has Closed for Winter. It will reopen May 15, 2015

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Great Basin National Park

Rank: 232 9 Activites Email: grba_interpretation@nps.gov

In the shadow of 13,063-foot Wheeler Peak, 5,000 year old bristlecone pine trees grow on rocky glacial moraines. Come to Great Basin National Park to experience the solitude of the desert, the smell of sagebrush after a thunderstorm, the darkest of night skies, and the beauty of Lehman Caves. Far from a wasteland, the Great Basin is a diverse region that awaits your discovery.

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Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument Park

Rank: 321 7 Activites Phone: (208)-933-4100 Email: hafo_information@nps.gov

Did you know horses evolved in North America? The Hagerman Horse, Equus simplicidens, was the first true horse but its bones most closely resembled Grevy's zebra bones. Hagerman is home to over two hundred different species of fossil plants and animals: including sabertooth cat, mastodon, bear, camel, ground sloth, and many other species. Over 3,000 new fossil fragments are found each year.

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Hovenweep National Monument Park

Rank: 312 2 Activites Phone: (970)-562-4282 Email: hoveinfo@nps.gov

Once home to over 2,500 people, Hovenweep includes six prehistoric villages built between A.D. 1200 and 1300. Explore a variety of structures, including multistory towers perched on canyon rims and balanced on boulders. The construction and attention to detail will leave you marveling at the skill and motivation of the builders.

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Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site

Rank: 244 Email: Hutr_Ranger_Activities@nps.gov

The squeaky wooden floor greets your entry into the oldest operating trading post on the Navajo Nation. When your eyes adjust to the dim light in the "bullpen" you find you've just entered a mercantile. Hubbell's has been serving Ganado selling groceries, grain, hardware, horse tack, coffee and Native American Art since 1878. Discover Hubbell Trading Post NHS, where history is made every day.

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Joshua Tree National Park

Rank: 50 7 Activites Phone: (760)-367-5500 Email: jotr_info@nps.gov

Two distinct desert ecosystems, the Mojave and the Colorado, come together in Joshua Tree National Park. A fascinating variety of plants and animals make their homes in a land sculpted by strong winds and occasional torrents of rain. Dark night skies, a rich cultural history, and surreal geologic features add to the wonder of this vast wilderness in southern California. Come explore for yourself.

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Lake Mead National Recreation Area Park

Rank: 6 14 Activites Phone: (702)-293-8990 Email: lake_interpretation@nps.gov

Lake Mead NRA offers year-round recreational opportunities for boaters, swimmers, fishermen, hikers, photographers and sightseers. It is also home to thousands of desert plants and animals, adapted to survive where rain is scarce and temperatures soar. Fun Volunteer Events more...  December Hikes more... Two-Stroke Engine Info | Permits | Events

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Manzanar National Historic Site

Rank: 242 1 Activites Email: MANZ_superintendent@nps.gov

In 1942, the United States government ordered more than 110,000 men, women, and children to leave their homes and detained them in remote, military-style camps. Manzanar War Relocation Center was one of ten camps where Japanese American citizens and resident Japanese aliens were interned during World War II.

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Mesa Verde National Park

Rank: 121 4 Activites Phone: (970)-529-4465 Email: meve_general_information@nps.gov

Mesa Verde, Spanish for green table, offers a spectacular look into the lives of the Ancestral Pueblo people who made it their home for over 700 years, from A.D. 600 to 1300. Today the park protects nearly 5,000 known archeological sites, including 600 cliff dwellings. These sites are some of the most notable and best preserved in the United States.

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Mojave National Preserve Park

Rank: 103 10 Activites Phone: (760)-252-6100 Email: Norma_Sosa@nps.gov

Singing sand dunes, volcanic cinder cones, Joshua tree forests, and carpets of wildflowers are all found at this 1.6 million acre park. A visit to its canyons, mountains and mesas will reveal long-abandoned mines, homesteads, and rock-walled military outposts. Located between Los Angeles and Las Vegas, Mojave provides serenity and solitude from major metropolitan areas.

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Natural Bridges National Monument Park

Rank: 239 4 Activites Email: nabrinfo@nps.gov

Three majestic natural bridges invite you to ponder the power of water in a landscape usually defined by its absence. View them from an overlook, or hit the trails and experience their grandeur from below. Declared a National Monument in 1908, the bridges are named "Kachina," "Owachomo" and "Sipapu" in honor of the Native Americans that once made this area their home.

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Navajo National Monument Park

Rank: 266 3 Activites Phone: (928)-672-2700 Email: NAVA_Superintendent@nps.gov

The prehistoric Puebloan Ancestors built Tsegi Phase villages within the natural sandstone alcoves of our canyons. The resilient Ancestral Puebloans paved the way for current Native American groups in the Southwest region. These villages, which date from AD 1250 to 1300, thrill all who visit with original architectural elements such as roof beams, masonary walls, rock art, and hand and foot holds.

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Parashant Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument Park

7 Activites Phone: (435)-688-3200 Email: paula_branstner@nps.gov

Grand Canyon Parashant's natural splendor provides a sense of solitude to those who venture into its isolated domain. Located on the edge of one of the most beautiful places on earth, the Grand Canyon, the Monument's expansive landscape encompasses a chronicle of natural and cultural history.

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